reshaping rochester

 

 


About

The 2022 Lecture Series features five lecture (February through June)

All lectures are from 12-1:30pm and will start out virtually on Zoom, with the hope of in-person events in the spring

.Check back for the most up-to-date information.

 

For more information send an e-mail here or call 585.271.0520

 

Sponsors

A special thank you to those that make this Series possible!

Gold Sponsor:

Lecture Event Sponsors:

 

Supporting Sponsors:


Charitable Foundation

WXXI

 

Contributing Luncheon Sponsor:

 

Lecture Series Friends:


County of Monroe Dept. of Planning & Development

 

James Fahy Design Associates

 

 

In-kind Sponsors:

AIA
(CES)

WXXI
(Exclusive Media Sponsor)


(Speaker Gifts)

 

 

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CDCR is supported, in part, by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

 



Click here to listen to past lectures.

 

 

Every year, the CDCR brings experts from around the country to share their knowledge with the local community regarding issues that are presenting challenges for our community through our lecture series.

PAST LECTURES:

Thank you for attending:

"A City That Works for Everyone"
Wed, February 23, 2022 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM ET via ZOOM

Our 2022 Lecture Series kickoff webinar, setting up a framework for this year's exploration of "The Ideal City" with CNU Executive Director Rick Cole via Zoom!

What does it mean for a city or community to be "ideal?" We will start exploring this through the lens of new urbanism.

Our communities face many challenges: segregation and inequity, affordability, a lack of owner-occupied housing, etc. Proposed solutions include multimodal transportation accessible across neighborhoods, sustainability and resilience in the face of climate change, local sources for food and energy in all seasons, a public realm of high value and inclusion, and lively 15-minute villages that exemplify local character and are easily connected.

Through this year's lecture series we will unpack what it means to be "ideal," explore cities that would be categorized as ideal, and ask if/how our own community could become ideal.

  		Reshaping Rochester Webinar with Rick Cole image

Rick Cole | Pasadena, CA

Executive Director at Congress for the New Urbanism (CNU)

Rick Cole was recently selected by CNU’s Board of Directors to be CNU’s fifth executive director since the organization’s founding three decades ago. He brings unique experience as an elected local official, city manager and urban policy expert to his role leading the staff of CNU.

Past Mayor of Pasadena, California, Cole was among the first elected officials in the nation to embrace New Urbanism, leading an effort to rewrite the city’s General Plan to embrace timeless ways of building and target new, human-scale development around the coming of light rail transit. Later, as City Manager of Azusa, he spearheaded the first citywide form-based code in California, a new urbanist tool for producing high quality design. Cole also championed civic engagement, affordable housing, complete streets, green building, and community wellbeing as the City Manager of Ventura and then Santa Monica. As Deputy Mayor for Budget and Innovation for the City of Los Angeles, where he oversaw a $5 billion budget and secured a $3.2 million grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies to set up an “I-Team” to seek ways to maximize community reinvestment to benefit existing residents.

 

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Thank you for attending:

"Worthy of Investment: Restoring Value to Black Communities"
Wed, March 23, 2022 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM ET via ZOOM

Our 2022 Lecture Series second webinar on equitable homeownership with Dr. Andre Perry via Zoom!

Rochester’s percentage of homeownership is 36.3% (nearly half of the national average) and Dr. Perry’s research has shown that Rochester underappraises Black homes by 65% (second highest percentage in the country). How can we ensure that homeownership is accessible to our most marginalized residents?

Through this year's lecture series we will unpack what it means to be "ideal," explore cities that would be categorized as ideal, and ask if/how our own community could become ideal.

 

  		Reshaping Rochester Webinar with Rick Cole image

Dr. Andre Perry | Washington, DC

Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute & Author of Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America's Black Cities)

Dr. Andre M. Perry is a Senior Fellow at Brookings Metro, a scholar-in-residence at American University, and a columnist for the Hechinger Report. A nationally known and respected commentator on race, structural inequality, and education, Perry is the author of the book “Know Your Price: Valuing Black Lives and Property in America’s Black Cities,” which is currently available wherever books are sold. Perry is a regular contributor to MSNBC and has been published by numerous national media outlets, including The New York Times, The Nation, The Washington Post, TheRoot.com and CNN.com. Perry has also made appearances on HBO, CNN, PBS, National Public Radio, NBC, and ABC. Perry’s research focuses on race and structural inequality, education, and economic inclusion. Perry’s recent scholarship at Brookings has analyzed Black-majority cities and institutions in America, focusing on valuable assets worthy of increased investment.

Perry's pioneering work on asset devaluation has made him a go to researcher for policymakers, community development professionals and civil rights groups. Perry co-authored the groundbreaking 2018 Brookings Institution report “The Devaluation of Assets in Black Neighborhoods” and has presented its findings on the price of home in Black neighborhoods across the country, including to the U.S. House Financial Services Committee. He has extended that report’s focus on housing in Black neighborhoods to include other assets such as businesses, schools and banks.

 

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Thank you for attending!

"Food Equity by Design"
Wed, April 27, 2022 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM ET via ZOOM

An afternoon webinar on urban agriculture & sustainable food systems with Dr. Samina Raja via Zoom!

Cities around the United States are rebuilding their community food infrastructure. Community gardens, urban farms, farmers' markets, rooftop gardens, and fresh food cooperatives are transforming food landscapes. How does this resurgent interest in communities’ food infrastructure center questions of equity and justice, if at all? Who controls food landscapes in cities? What role can planning and design play in creating a more just and equitable community food infrastructure? Drawing on community-centered research completed in US cities, Dr. Samina Raja will explore these questions in her talk as part of the Reshaping Rochester series.

Through this year's lecture series we will unpack what it means to be "ideal," explore cities that would be categorized as ideal, and ask if/how our own community could become ideal.

 

 

  		Reshaping Rochester Webinar with Rick Cole image

Dr. Samina Raja (PhD) | Buffalo, NY

Professor, Department of Urban and Regional Planning  + Director, Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab + Associate Dean for Research and Inclusive Excellence, School of Architecture and Planning (University at Buffalo)

Dr. Samina Raja is a Professor of Urban and Regional Planning and the Associate Dean for Research and Inclusive Excellence at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York. Trained in civil engineering and urban planning, Dr. Raja’s research focuses on the potential of community-led planning and policy to create equitable and healthy communities.

She is the founder and Director of the Food Systems Planning and Healthy Communities Lab and Co-Directs the Community for Global Health Equity. With community and academic partners, she currently leads an action-research initiative, Growing Food Policy from the Ground Up, to build the capacity of growers of color to shape urban agriculture policy (in Buffalo, NY and Minneapolis, MN). A larger, national-scale project Growing Food Connections focuses on the use of local government planning to strengthen community food systems. Her work outside of the US highlights the ways in which smallholder urban farmers in the Global South promote food sovereignty, particularly in cities experiencing protracted crises (Srinagar, Kashmir). Most recently, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the UN published her (and co-authors’) monograph that offers guidance on the role of local government planning in strengthening food systems in low- and middle-income countries.

A widely published scholar, Dr. Raja is the recipient of numerous awards including for her mentorship (2020 Distinguished Post Doc Mentor), community-engaged work (2016 Excellence in Community-University Engagement), and scholarship (2014 Dale Scholar).

 

 

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Thank you for attending!

"Electrifying Everything: The Path to Full City Decarbonization"

Wed, May 25, 2022 | 12:00 PM – 1:30 PM ET via ZOOM

An afternoon webinar on the sustainabale city in times of climate change with Rebecca Evans via Zoom!

A critical part of urban self-sufficiency centers on how a city obtains its energy. How can we be sure that energies will be there when we need them? How does generating energy play a role in urban self-sufficiency? And most importantly, how does all of this intersect with sustainability and climate change?

Through this year's lecture series we will unpack what it means to be "ideal," explore cities that would be categorized as ideal, and ask if/how our own community could become ideal.

 

  		Reshaping Rochester Webinar with Rick Cole image

Rebecca Evans | Ithaca, NY

Sustainability Planner at City of Ithaca

In 2019, the City of Ithaca, NY made the bold decision to adopt the Ithaca Green New Deal, a resolution that committed the city to community-wide carbon neutrality by 2030. Over the past three years, the City has developed the most aggressive decarbonization plan in the country and secured over $100 million in funding from private equity to execute their plan. As progress on the Ithaca GND continues, it stands to serve as a blueprint for other U.S. municipalities as we continue to grapple with the changing economy and climate.
Rebecca Evans, Sustainability Planner for the City of Ithaca, will share the grassroots effort that led to the Ithaca Green New Deal resolution and the City’s implementation plan. She’ll discuss the nation-leading electrification program, the critical need to build and maintain community partnerships, and the justice lens through which all Green New Deal projects are designed and implemented.

 

 

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Thank you for attending!

 

"The Public Realm as Social Infrastructure: An Introduction to Human-Scale Design"

Wednesday, June 15, 2022 | 11:30am - 1:30pm

M&T Bank Ballroom, Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave)


In the wake of the pandemic the role of the public realm has been thrown into focus as a place of health, respite, social connection, equity and reconciliation, and civic discourse.

Fifty percent of the land in our cities is public, and more than one third is streets. How should citymakers value the public realm and the public life it supports as a piece of critical infrastructure?

Learn about how Gehl’s ethnographic approach has helped citymakers around the world put people first in the urban change process by creating data and a powerful narrative about public life and public space. Learn from case studies around the world about how human-scale design has created positive returns for public life and the social infrastructure of cities.

Through this year's lecture series we will unpack what it means to be "ideal," explore cities that would be categorized as ideal, and ask if/how our own community could become ideal.

 

  		Reshaping Rochester Webinar with Rick Cole image

Anna Muessig | San Francisco, CA

Director at Gehl, San Francisco

Anna Muessig is an Urban Planner specializing in creative placemaking, cultural programming, and economic development. She sees street culture and the mobility experience as the building blocks to healthy, vibrant public life in cities. She brings expertise in creative engagement and evidence-based storytelling to shape the built environment in a way that puts people in the center of the decisions that shape our cities. At Gehl, she leads public life studies, designs public realm action plans, and uses creative interventions to shape the culture of what streets can be. She has worked on a diverse range of projects including the redesign of San Francisco’s Civic Center, building a movement for human-centered streets with Ford, and designing the interface between micro-mobility and a sense of place.

Some of Anna’s previous projects include investigating the impact of Minneapolis’ creative economy, urban strategy for New Orleans commercial corridors, the urban design of manufacturing in San Francisco and Brooklyn, organizing a Brooklyn food co-op, and a large-scale night-time public art event in Brooklyn. Anna holds a Masters in City Planning from MIT.

 

 

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This was the Annual Roger Brown Lecture
Roger Brown is the CDCR's founding father, a past board member, and longtime lecture committee member. We appreciate his guidance and friendship!